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2021 Intern Presenters

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | XYZ

Presenters are sorted by alpha order based on last name.

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A

Florence Ahn | Music

Teaching Music Literacy to Second Grade in the Virtual Learning Format | Click here to view presentation

Music literacy is essential for the National Core Arts Standards curricular strands of Creating and Performing music. As the School Improvement Plan includes literacy goals, the content-specific skill of music literacy can connect with the school-wide plan. It is expected that second grade students will be able to read and perform rhythm patterns using quarter notes, two-beamed eighth notes, quarter rests, half notes, and half rests. Students in second grade learned these rhythms through composing, responding, reading and playing games from December 2020. A Kahoot was administered to all second grade students in February, 2021. The data helped to create a select group of students who reviewed, identified, read and performed the selected rhythms with the intern teacher. There are 4 ELL students, 2 with an IEP or with a 504 plan. There are 6 male and 5 female students from diverse racial backgrounds. The same students were given the same Kahoot after three sessions and the data was compared to the original test. The results found that there was a small improvement in student results; however irregular attendance and the virtual learning format played a contributing factor in the small range of improvement.

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B

Scott Boettinger, Hannah Boyer, Ahser Kaye, Pat Michael, Claud Moutome, and Danille Skyes | Mathematics

How the Reformed Observation Teaching Protocol (RTOP) Effects Student Learning in Mathematics | Click here to view presentation

The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol, RTOP for short, is a rubric which acts as a way to assess teachers and their lessons in order to push them towards a more student centered, activity based learning environment. Of the twenty five rows, only five were chosen to be the focus for this study; rows 3, 4, 7, 10, and 12. While all twenty five rows are important and should be considered in a larger sense, these five were chosen because these are considered the “lynchpin rows” meaning performance in these rows will affect all other rows across the rubric. In this study we will be investigating the correlation between RTOP scores of six preservice teacher candidates in the Baltimore City School District and the scores of their students learning mathematics ranging from eighth grade to eleventh grade in various schools across the district. As research shows that students benefit from inquiry based learning that is more student centered, we hypothesize the higher a teacher candidate scores on these five rows, the better their students will learn the material and thus score higher on consequent summative and formative assessments.

Brett Born | Social Studies

Document Based Writing | Click here to view presentation

The ability to develop an argument using reliable sources is the cornerstone of historical writing. This will be done by observing the progress of 28 students in my World Cultures Honors class at Catonsville High school. The data that will be collected is based on the students’ ability to create strong essays. They will be graded on how well they can develop a topic sentence, use and cite textual evidence to support their topic sentence, and finally their ability to create a developed conclusion. The goal is for all students to increase their score by 1-point or 10% of their baseline grade. This will be done by scaffolding their reading techniques. First the students will be taught how to pull valuable evidence from a document to help support an argument. Students will also be taught how to develop a proper paragraph using scaffolding. They will be shown how to develop a proper topic sentence, cite documents, and create a strong conclusion. The students will be assessed once a week for approximately 4 months by having them write paragraphs to a weekly overarching question.

 

Zoe Bulitt | Social Studies | 2021 Outstanding Inquiry Study Award Winner

Tell Me Why: Historical Analysis and Commentary in Written Argumentative Pieces | Click here to view presentation

The implementation of the C3 framework into the Social Studies curriculum requires more than just the memorization of dates and names and places; it requires critical thinking about the content. By 8th grade they should demonstrate mastery in developing a claim, analyzing sources, and pulling relevant evidence from those sources to support a claim The last step in this process focuses on historical significance or the “why”. I will be observing the work of seven 8th grade students in the Advanced U.S. History 8 class at William H. Farquhar Middle School. Students will use the County Common Writing Task MP1 rubric guidelines to show they understand what is being asked of them in their analysis over various writing pieces. I will specifically focus on the ability of students to provide adequate analysis of textual evidence or “Historical” commentary; ability to evaluate sources for reliability and corroborate those sources used within their constructed response. The target goal is that 80% or more of the students will improve their Reasoning score, as outlined in the County CWT MP1 rubric, by one point or more. Learning will be supported with scaffolding of materials, providing sentence starters to help guide their thinking, copious amounts of class time to discuss their work, and feedback given throughout for chances of revision and improvement.

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C

Melissa Corona | Theatre

Let’s Get Physical! | Click here to view presentation

In order to create a believable character, students must base their performance on their own life experiences. This connection to one self helps provide the ability to deliver a monologue, and communicate a character’s experience in an authentic way. Showcasing skills such as text analysis, vocal and particularly physical characteristic techniques such as posture and movement, which includes the physical, vocal and emotional dimensions of a character. In this study we will be focusing on the Physical performance aspect. Students will be measured by achievement on a range of performing teacher developed performance tasks, focusing on physical characterization such as pantomime and method work. A Theatre Education Rubric will help guide the teacher in assessing the students over a 10 week period, who will be measured on a scale from 1-4, 4 being the highest level of physical characterization. Throughout the period students will study units focused on building pantomime and method acting skills. This advanced Theatre class including twelve students from a diverse suburban high school, grades 10-12, will demonstrate growth toward mastery of the content and skills of Theatre. The class is made up of students with diverse racial and gender backgrounds.

Julia Cowles | Theatre

Physicality in theatre | Click here to view presentation

Beginner theatre students study how to use their minds to analyze text, use their voices to tell a story, and use their bodies to portray a character physically. While all of these skills are imperative for good storytelling, beginning with physical theatre can ease students into performance by getting students out of their heads and up on their feet. For this reason, the growth in the physical theatre skills of 30 beginner high school theatre students ranging from ninth to twelfth grade were studied over the course of a semester. Utilizing multiple performances throughout the course as checkpoints, growth was measured by rubric in the use of posture, gestures/mannerisms, and facial expressions. By providing specific feedback, giving opportunities for peer and self-critique, and experimentation, students honed their physical theatre skills. The techniques and methods learned in physical theatre practice translate to public speaking skills that will prepare students for any career path they may choose.

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F

John Fisher | Science

Improving Scientific Literacy Through Writing Development | Click here to view presentation

The subject of our research is the student learning objective (SLO) of “100% of students will demonstrate growth in Next Generation Science Standards for Life Science through their ability to read, analyze, and infer scientific texts. This SLO was chosen due to the fact that the Next Generation Science Standards have a science and engineering practices section, as well as the Science Department’s goal of improving Scientific Literacy. Creating a Student Learning Objective on communicating scientific principles with evidence is essential to creating student scientists. To communicate results effectively, 12 data points will be collected over 3 units of study. Data will be collected and evaluated using samples of written work and an 8 point scale. From baselines data, the sample population averaged a score of 4.6. This was heavily due to weak or broad claims, which is the basis of their written responses. From this preliminary data, the class’s target goal is to have 90% of students score at least a 6 on 3 out the last 4 data points.

 

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I

Jumina Ito | Science

Claim-Evidence-Reasoning Strategies to Improve Scientific Writing | Click here to view presentation

Effective use of claims and counterclaims to support or refute arguments with relevant evidence is necessary for any content area, but is especially pertinent to science learning. It is important that students acknowledge objective facts and research in the science field, but understand that differing perspectives of researchers impact how science knowledge is disseminated. The goal of this research was to improve student ability to use evidence and reasoning to support and refute scientific arguments. This was accomplished by implementing strategies like verbal debates, graphic organizers, and peer writing sample analysis. Each strategy was specifically scaffolded according to the literacy level of the twenty-three tenth grade chemistry students being evaluated. Baseline data collected from my urban high school students suggested that some students showed proficiency in their ability to stake a claim for argumentation and understand what evidence is relevant to a particular topic, but most students struggled with making meaningful and convincing connections between evidence and claims using valid reasoning. The goal at the completion of data collection is for all students to increase by one rubric level. Students were evaluated using a Claim-Evidence-Reasoning essay format and the Common Core argumentative writing rubric at all points of data collection.

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K

Scott Boettinger, Hannah Boyer, Ahser Kaye, Pat Michael, Claud Moutome, and Danille Skyes | Mathematics

How the Reformed Observation Teaching Protocol (RTOP) Effects Student Learning in Mathematics | Click here to view presentation

The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol, RTOP for short, is a rubric which acts as a way to assess teachers and their lessons in order to push them towards a more student centered, activity based learning environment. Of the twenty five rows, only five were chosen to be the focus for this study; rows 3, 4, 7, 10, and 12. While all twenty five rows are important and should be considered in a larger sense, these five were chosen because these are considered the “lynchpin rows” meaning performance in these rows will affect all other rows across the rubric. In this study we will be investigating the correlation between RTOP scores of six preservice teacher candidates in the Baltimore City School District and the scores of their students learning mathematics ranging from eighth grade to eleventh grade in various schools across the district. As research shows that students benefit from inquiry based learning that is more student centered, we hypothesize the higher a teacher candidate scores on these five rows, the better their students will learn the material and thus score higher on consequent summative and formative assessments.

 

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L

Alison Lavia | Dance

Pirouettes & Posture: Improving Pirouette Technique Through Analyzing Dynamic Alignment | Click here to view presentation

Body alignment and postural awareness play an important role in the stability and control of a dancer’s movements. Through understanding their dynamic alignment, dancers can safely move their bodies through space without putting unequal stress on certain muscles and joints, ultimately preventing injury and improving their balance. One can define dynamic alignment as the body’s ability to change positions across planes of movement while maintaining structural support. A pirouette is a type of turn used across multiple styles of dance that requires a nuanced knowledge of alignment to execute properly. This research examines the best practices that will help students learn why proper alignment is important in dance through learning how to perform a pirouette. During one unit in the sixth grade dance class, students studied the dynamics of a pirouette through peer feedback, imagery, diagrams and observing a professional dance video. Data from a sixteen point rubric with categories in pirouette preparation alignment, accuracy in the lower body movements, accuracy in the upper body movements, and focus and spotting, was compared from the beginning of the unit to the end of the unit to identify student growth and progress.

Daniel Lim | Science

Improving Scientific Writing in the CER Format | Click here to view presentation

The Claim-Evidence-Reasoning framework (CER) is a form of scientific writing that helps structure scientific writing. It emphasizes a clear answer supported by data that is sufficiently explained. This study seeks to improve CER writing by making the material culturally relevant. By allowing students to engage in argumentative discussion in topics relatable to them, they could better understand the purpose and use of CER’s. The students in question are 12 9th grade students from an urban high school. They are all taking PreAP Biology, and the 12 students are spread evenly from two class periods. A baseline assessment was taken in the middle of 2nd quarter, where the students averaged a score of 11.08 out of 20, based on the CER rubric. The topics they struggled with most were “Evidence” and “Reasoning.” The teacher led them in a CER lesson that was focused around verbal argumentation, group discussion, and culturally relevant topics. The goal of this study is to improve 75% of the students by two points or to maintain a score of at least 18 if that was their baseline. Ideally, these points will be gained in the Evidence and/or Reasoning section.

Benjamin Lockwood | Science

Closing the Achievement Gap Through Differentiated Instructional Support | Click here to view presentation

Low performing students are often stuck in a cycle of low performance for numerous reasons, especially in a rigorous subject, such as science. Despite this, teachers should work to support all students, in effort to ensure all students’ success. The goal of this research was to close the achievement gap between above average and average or below average performing students of the same grade. The students in this study are high school students in an urban setting from various socio-economic statuses. To identify students as at or below average performing, a pre-test was done for the second unit test of the chemistry curriculum. From the pretest data students were categorized into two groups, Group A (students who scored 30%), and Group B (students who scored <30%), with the average grade at 28%. To close this gap, students in Group B had additional instructional supports, such as graphic organizers, guided note sheets, scaffolded reading prompts, and weekly intervention check-ins. Twenty-five students from across both of my chemistry courses fell into Group B. The goal for students in Group B is to achieve greater than 50% on the unit two post-test.

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M

Scott Boettinger, Hannah Boyer, Ahser Kaye, Pat Michael, Claud Moutome, and Danille Skyes | Mathematics

How the Reformed Observation Teaching Protocol (RTOP) Effects Student Learning in Mathematics | Click here to view presentation

The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol, RTOP for short, is a rubric which acts as a way to assess teachers and their lessons in order to push them towards a more student centered, activity based learning environment. Of the twenty five rows, only five were chosen to be the focus for this study; rows 3, 4, 7, 10, and 12. While all twenty five rows are important and should be considered in a larger sense, these five were chosen because these are considered the “lynchpin rows” meaning performance in these rows will affect all other rows across the rubric. In this study we will be investigating the correlation between RTOP scores of six preservice teacher candidates in the Baltimore City School District and the scores of their students learning mathematics ranging from eighth grade to eleventh grade in various schools across the district. As research shows that students benefit from inquiry based learning that is more student centered, we hypothesize the higher a teacher candidate scores on these five rows, the better their students will learn the material and thus score higher on consequent summative and formative assessments.

Courtney Mikell | Dance

Turn It Up! Using B.A.S.T.E. to Improve a Dance Technique | Click here to view presentation

The objective of my research is to help students improve their dance techniques based on the five elements of dance, commonly referred to as B.A.S.T.E., which is the acronym for: body, action, space, time, and energy. A dance technique commonly performed in various genres of dance are turns. The piqué turn which is a complex turn will provide mastery of skills when this technique is executed properly. Six female 6th grade students from an urban middle school will be taught the piqué turn based on B.A.S.T.E. Students will be taught the piqué turn using visual presentations and repetitive physical demonstrations of the turn. The students will be assessed on their performance of the piqué turn using the B.A.S.T.E. Performance Rubric, which is based on a 20-point scale. To properly execute the piqué turn, students will need to demonstrate this dance technique with proper body coordination, force, spatial pathway, tempo, and artistic expression. Students will be assessed from week 1 at the minimal level with the goal for students to improve their proficiency of performing the piqué turn to a level of 3 or higher by week 6. Successful achievement of this technique will allow students to Turn Up their performance.

 

Hansel Motiram | Science

Abstract to Equations: Taking Common Knowledge and Making it Mathematical | Click here to view presentation

Students often possess a wealth of working knowledge about the world, even before education gives them the proper terms and structures through which to express ideas. This is particularly evident in STEM, a realm represented by subject specific terminology, mathematical models and graphic illustrations of data. Yet students struggle to convey their knowledge when the required form is more mathematical, such as scientific equations, which are a staple of the academic language and a vital shorthand for navigating complex topics in STEM fields. To cultivate this skill, twenty ninth grade students were assessed via a ten question google form quiz on their ability to translate abstract ideas into equations and utilize biology specific vocabulary to describe processes we had learned. Then over the following three weeks students executed creative multimedia assignments such as forming equations out of familiar words and pictures, matching vocabulary with representative images, and critically analyzing and revising the work of other groups. This was followed by a post assessment in the same form as the pre assessment, in order to evaluate growth. Analysis of this data showed students showed moderate improvement in their ability to translate from abstract to mathematical and linguistically specific formats.

 

Mark Muth | World Languages

Quid significat? Vocabulary Retention in the Latin Classroom | Click here to view presentation

Vocabulary is an essential skill in the language classroom. In a recent unit, students (n=13) in an urban parochial High School Latin II course averaged 94% on vocabulary-based formative assessments and averaged 92% on the vocabulary section of the summative assessment. However, two weeks after the summative assessment, students quizzed on a random sampling of vocabulary from that unit only achieved on average 62%.These results demonstrated the need for targeted intervention to strengthen mastery of vocabulary. This study investigated the effect of a targeted intervention to review vocabulary on the retention rates. Twice per week students reviewed vocab using the game ‘Quizlet Live.’ During the other meeting times, the teacher used the time to do spoken Latin activities to review vocab. Students were given three unannounced assessments with 15 words randomly selected from their vocabulary. One assessment was at mid-unit, after approximately 1.5 weeks of treatment. Assessment two was at the end of unit, after approximately 3 weeks of treatment. Assessment three was two weeks after the treatment had stopped at the unit’s end. This data is compared to baseline data to determine if retention gains were significant to justify extra class time.

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P

Nicolas Pascual | Career Technical Education

 Using web based modeling software to develop design skills | Click here to view presentation

The overall goal of CTE (Career Technical Education)is to prepare students to become college and career ready by the time they graduate high school. That said, the primary means through which I will achieve that goal is helping students start that progress to becoming certified CADD (Computer Aided Design/Drafting) users by the end of their Junior or Senior year. This certification will open many doors, including acceptance into colleges that offer degrees in Architecture, Engineering, and other Construction Management fields. The CADD certification will also cater to those students who envision themselves pursuing a post high school career in any of the Construction, Design and Construction Management fields, such as plumbing, electrical, HVAC or general contracting. With the job market becoming increasingly more competitive, students must rise to the challenge, and ensure that they are ultimately the better choice to prospective employers by demonstrating their proficiency operating CADD software as well as their design skills.

Creating a college dorm room drawing encompasses many skills only attainable through months of practice with various drawing and modeling scenarios. This SLO incorporates skills learned in Geometry, namely scale, geometric dimensions and proportion. These skills are needed when drafting any drawing or modeling in CADD. Growth will be measured by various checkpoints throughout the 2020-2021 School year. The check points will measure their ability to identify tools and how to apply those tools in various 2D  drawing and 3D modeling scenarios. Once students become familiar with the tools they will then advance into creating original works of design, this iteration will involve designing a dorm room to demonstrate their proficiency.

 

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R

Mary Ramm | English

Text in Context: Using Text Evidence to Support Claims | Click here to view presentation

The ability to draw conclusions from a text is an essential objective of the English Language Arts curriculum and is an important skill for students, but it is something that many eighth grade students struggle with in their writing. This study assessed students’ in a virtual classroom at a public suburban middle school and their ability to use direct, quotational evidence to demonstrate inferential understanding and make connections between what they have read and then using that evidence to support their views. Students were assessed on a four point scale and no students reached mastery on the pre-assessment. The goal was for 100% of the selected students to demonstrate growth toward mastery and to demonstrate growth by increasing their scores at least one point on the rubric. Interventions included instructional methods such as modeling effective techniques and strategies, scheduled formative assessments, and regular instructor feedback. Additionally, students had individualized writing goals and were provided opportunities to engage with a variety of writing assignments and levels of rigor, which they will be able to self and peer review. The purpose of this research is to improve the use of text evidence by these students, while assessing the best modes of instruction for this skill.

Christa Reyes | Science

The Effects of Explicit Instruction on the Students’ Proficiency with CER Writing | Click here to view presentation

Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning or CER is an important skill that students must engage in science classrooms. The National Generation Science Standards or NGSS incorporate practices that real scientists perform. This includes skills that are necessary for CER writing such as analyzing and interpreting data, as well as engaging in argument based on evidence. CER writing leads to the deeper understanding of science concepts (Zohar & Nemet, 2002). It enhances the scientific literacy skills of students as well. This study explores the effects of explicit instruction on the students’ proficiency with CER writing. The population consisted of 15 freshmen from varying gender, racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds in an urban high school. The subjects were chosen based on the scores that they received during the pre-test. The students were expected to write a complete CER based on the big question. Using the district-provided rubric, the researcher evaluated the students’ work. The expectation of this study is for the students who have received a score of less than 60% on the pre-test to receive at least a 60% on the post-test at the end of the marking period. The teaching strategies that were implemented to reach this goal included: modeling how to complete a CER perfectly, gradual introduction of the different components of CER, daily practice of completing a portion of CER or the whole CER, provision of sentence starters and organizers, evaluation of peer samples using the rubric, and evaluation of their own CER using the rubric.

 

Kylie Jo Rutherford | Social Studies

A Snapshot of History and its Context | Click here to view presentation

Throughout a social studies classroom, students review primary and secondary sources in order to grasp the meaning behind them and the message they are trying to portray. The use of reliable sources helps students better understand the importance of them. It is important for students to grasp this concept early in their schooling for future classroom usage throughout their secondary school and higher education schooling. Before the SLO, many of the ninth grade (GT) US history students knew how to understand sources through text, but not much through visualization. Students were able to understand the image, but not the underlying messages that were built into it. This research helped students learn how to find all messages that may be present in the image/source.

 

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S

Scott Boettinger, Hannah Boyer, Ahser Kaye, Pat Michael, Claud Moutome, and Danille Skyes | Mathematics

How the Reformed Observation Teaching Protocol (RTOP) Effects Student Learning in Mathematics | Click here to view presentation

The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol, RTOP for short, is a rubric which acts as a way to assess teachers and their lessons in order to push them towards a more student centered, activity based learning environment. Of the twenty five rows, only five were chosen to be the focus for this study; rows 3, 4, 7, 10, and 12. While all twenty five rows are important and should be considered in a larger sense, these five were chosen because these are considered the “lynchpin rows” meaning performance in these rows will affect all other rows across the rubric. In this study we will be investigating the correlation between RTOP scores of six preservice teacher candidates in the Baltimore City School District and the scores of their students learning mathematics ranging from eighth grade to eleventh grade in various schools across the district. As research shows that students benefit from inquiry based learning that is more student centered, we hypothesize the higher a teacher candidate scores on these five rows, the better their students will learn the material and thus score higher on consequent summative and formative assessments.

 

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T

Claire Thomas | Theatre

The Art of Performance: How Students Become the Best Physical Performer | Click here to view presentation

Students perform in their daily lives with public speaking, body language, and sharing stories with one another; this research seeks to determine best strategies for achieving mastery in making strong physical choices with their body language, poise, and eye contact. 25 Theatre One students were evaluated based upon their growth from four major performances throughout the semester. These performances were in various forms ranging from monologues to scene work with a group. The students were evaluated on their physical choices through the use of sharing emotions through body language, performing with confidence and grace, and keeping eye contact with their audience. The goal was to hopefully see student’s progress throughout the year on their performance skills by taking a beginner theatre course. The students participated in self-critique after their final performance to see where they think their skills have grown and improved as well. Overall, the effectiveness of the study resulted in a majority of the students meeting the target scores of improvement for a beginner student, an increased score by one or two points.

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U

Keith Ullman | Theatre

Secondary Theatre- Content: Collaborative performance | Click here to view presentation

To generate a realistic and organic theater experience students must work collaboratively and be engaged in instruction. This connection to each other through collaborative interactions helps students to create more believable and organic performances and is also an important skill in the workplace. This research examined 14 High School Theater One students over two units of instruction to determine if active engagement in the class’s collaborative assignments resulted in a one-point higher score as measured by the modified Maryland Theatre Anchor 6 5-point rubric. Each unit assessment was based on individual student performance in assigned group work. Students were asked to self-assess on their engagement throughout the units of study. Student self-assessment scores were compared to their teacher’s scoring based on the rubric where the outcome is a holistic improvement, a goal that is an appropriate area of focus as students must move from individual performance tasks to working in groups of collaboration.

 

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